Custom GPS Mount

Submitted to Community Café

California has some laws about where on the windshield you can mount a GPS - lower left or lower right corners. Not a law a lot of people follow or a lot of law enforcement enforce but why invite the legal process? In our 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse windshield mounting is kind of fun because of the slope of the windshield. Plus, I prefer the navigator to do the navigating and the driver to be able to view the navigation screen. Therefore, a center position is preferred. Also, center mounted allows the driver to see the GPS without taking his / her eyes totally away from the road as well as operate it when not accompanied. This GPS has a camera system which generates lane warning and forward collision avoidance. So “hiding” it low takes that capability away.

With some scrap sheet steel that was in the workshop this is the mount I created. It is a two-piece unit. The first piece is bolted to the radio / center console cover. This has small slot underneath it for the second piece to slide into. The second piece actually holds the GPS in close to a perfect position. Both the driver and passenger can read the screen for information or access the GPS for control. For more extensive work such as altering a route the GPS is simply lifted out of its bracket. Super for parking the car when you want the GPS hidden.

When sitting in the driver’s seat it blocks my view of the passenger side windshield wiper and an area just above the passenger side hood but not very much. With this positioning my Wife can play navigator and I can see the screen without taking my eyes that far away from the road. In these photos the camera is about shoulder height.

While the GPS has a suction cup attaching point, it weights TONS and in the Southern California heat I simply do not trust it. With our old, much lighter GPS and its suction cup mount we found the GPS on the floor often enough we simply starting putting it there whenever we parked.

After welding, grinding, and sand blasting – nice to have a workshop – it was sprayed Rust-Oleum Flat Black to reduce the glare factor.

Thanks,

Rex